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January 5, 2021
by Adam Roberts
New York City has 59 Community Boards. Image: Courtesy of NYC Dept. of City Planning.
New York City has 59 Community Boards. Image: Courtesy of NYC Department of City Planning.

Borough presidents and New York City members are now accepting applications for community board appointments. Community boards are volunteer advisory groups that provide key neighborhood input to city agencies and elected officials.

The primary responsibility of community board members is overseeing land-use issues, such as zoning changes, in their district. That’s why AIA New York believes it’s so essential that more land-use professionals, including architects, serve on community boards. Currently, nearly 40 AIANY members are also serve on community boards, providing much-needed professional expertise on land use.

Architects may apply to serve in the community board where they work or where they live. We recommend that those interested in serving attend local community board meetings and connect with current members to get a more complete picture of the obligations and functions that serving entails.

Reach out to Adam Roberts, Director of Policy, at aroberts@aiany.org or 212-358-6116 if you apply or have any questions. He will keep track of your application and will advocate with your borough president and council member for your appointment.

See the following applications for community board appointments by borough:

Policy Points

  • Last month, AIANY hosted its annual City Hall Advocacy Day. We virtually met with council members and their staff on a number of pressing issues. These included funding for the city’s capital program in the upcoming budget, continued enforcement of Local Law 97, and appointments of architects to community boards. Other opportunities for virtual advocacy days at the state and federal level will be available to members in the coming months; we hope you will join us.
  • NYC has a crucial upcoming election on June 22 for all city positions, including Mayor and City Council. Though that election is just a primary, most positions will effectively be determined by Democratic primary winners due to the city’s Democratic lean. You can see a list of candidates running here. The AIA New York Political Action Fund will be releasing a voter guide with candidate ratings to provide further information on candidates to members.

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